Tips & Tricks

It’s About Time

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Our consoles give us the ability to manage timing in varied methods…When a parameter changes from one value to another, a time is assigned that dictates the speed at which the value change will occur; this is called fade time.  Most consoles let you assign a specific fade time for each parameter of every light.  You could have a cue with multiple fade times that cause different parameters or fixtures to change at different rates, or assign some fixtures that increase intensity as others are fading. Most consoles also offer the ability to adjust the delay time — the time when a programmed fade time starts.  Another timing parameter, known as follow time, controls the amount of time between each cue or step. You can assign a follow time of a cue to a specific value, or you can tell the console to auto-follow or follow-on.  Auto-follow causes the next cue to automatically begin its fades and delays as the previous cue completes all its combined fade and delay times.  The follow time can also be set to manual. At any moment, of course, you can override programmed times as long as you understand the controls at your fingertips.

—From “Feeding the Machines” Brad Schiller, PLSN, Oct. 2013.

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Metallica Concert Scenes for 3D Film Included New Programming Challenges

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“Programming a film is different, because we are always looking at intensity levels on everything: the band, the set, the audience. We still had the thousands of cues, just like the touring show. We ended up changing some of the stage and set pieces after the first two months of programming in 2011. We also changed out the fixture types in a few places. It is always a challenge for focuses in the round. You really need to walk the room’s 360 degrees when updating graphic focuses. We moved the console several times during the programming and playback. This gave us a better perspective for the 360-degree gig. Sometimes paying attention to the lighting system was a challenge. It was very spread out. On top of that, when the fire, lasers and video were all going, there was a lot to look at.”

—From Troy Eckerman, who joined LD John Broderick and programmer Rob Koenig in a conversation about Metallica Through the Never with Debi Moen for “Designer Watch,” PLSN, Oct. 2013.

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Tour-Friendly Venue Design

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Some venues care about the act and theater, even if the design of their venue is a tad outdated. Sometime in the 1980s, people came up with the concept of building big stages and covering them with a big white tent. This does protect the stage from rain, etc.; but it also allows all the sunlight right through the translucent roof. What I love about the Shoreline venue in San Jose is that they have black drapes that they insist on closing before the event, masking any unwanted light from hitting the stage. These guys care about your show. Of course, the big problem is that this venue was built in the 1980s and they have endured growing pains. The stage is not deep, the roof not tall. But the real problem is with the layout — I have been playing there 30 years, and I have never seen my band from the front of house mix position. The seats here are on a good rake, looking down at what appears to be a three-foot stage. My front of house area is flat. I will never see the stage over the audience when they stand.

—From “LD-at-Large” by Nook Schoenfeld, PLSN, Oct. 2013

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Pippin: Sharing the Grid with Lighting, Acrobatic Gear

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Tony Award-winning LD Kenneth Posner got a chance to limber up some new artistic muscles for Pippin on Broadway, which featured European-style circus performers. An important part of the lighting design concerned the grid over the stage and the performers. The real estate there had to be split between the acrobatic gear and the lighting truss in order to avoid having the circus performers shake the grid, a situation that could prove dangerous. “I learned a lot about the circus world and the notion of lighting performers moving through space, lighting three-dimensionally. So as the performer moved through the air they were lit, which is something I don’t normally have to deal with. That was a challenge that I embraced and fell in love with on Pippin.”

— From “Inside Theatre” by Bryan Reesman, PLSN Sept. 2013, page 22

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How to Create an Epic Show

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“Years ago, Shep Gordon (manager for Alice Cooper and Luther Vandross) taught me that the key to creating a memorable show that is equally as successful on the financial statements as it is to the public is to make anything that you do appear three times larger than it actually is… If it is a five-truck show, make it look like 15. In our case, we took 18 trucks and filled the arena. I want Shep to know that the formula still works!”

—Tom Marzullo, Tour Director/Production Designer for Justin Bieber’s Believe World Tour, as quoted by Steve Jennings for “Designer Insights,” PLSN, Sept. 2013

 

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Kling-Net: An Alternative to Merging DMX

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How do you take two different DMX sources and combine them into one signal? The answer, until recently, has been to use a piece of hardware that can receive both DMX source inputs and then merge them back into one DMX signal that is then sent to the fixture(s). This has been simplified somewhat, however, by the software engineers at ArKaos who developed Kling-Net. Kling-Net was created as an alternative communication protocol for pixel mapping video on an LED fixture. As it is an Ethernet-based protocol, it is sent out from an ArKaos media server via an Ethernet cable and then connected directly to the fixture or via a switch and then out to several fixtures. This communication protocol is not the same as DMX or Art-Net, and it does not require being merged back into the DMX stream before communicating with the fixture.

—From “Video Digerati” by Vickie Claiborne, PLSN, Sept. 2013

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Pre-viz Fixtures: Results May Vary

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I have found that the biggest “gotcha” when working with a visualizer comes not from the differences with the plot versus reality, but rather with the fixtures. Every visualizer has its own library of lighting fixtures similar to the libraries that exist in lighting consoles. However, the visualizer fixture libraries must contain much more data than just the DMX mapping, because they have to emulate the actual output. In some cases, this can result in incorrect information that can lead to programming errors. For instance, if the zoom operates differently in the real fixture than it does in the visualizer library, you will find that all your programming relating to zoom will be wrong. Every narrow zoom you saw in the visualizer would be full-wide zoom with the real fixtures.

—From “Feeding the Machines” by Brad Schiller, PLSN, Sept. 2013

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A Lemon of a Color

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I believe most people have a favorite color. I’m partial to a deep blue myself. I asked around. Guys seem to like blues and purples. Girls like red and pinks. Some musical acts hate certain colors and have actually asked me to never light them in a certain color, while others only allow themselves to be lit in certain colors. But one thing I found is that nobody really digs yellow. I personally use it carefully at times. Like when emulating sunrays on a rear cyc, or stabbing fans of light in a rock show. If I am lighting a punk rock band, I may use it because it looks really horrible. But it seems like if you illuminate 99 percent of the objects in the world in yellow, they will look nastier. Perhaps there is a theater character other than Sponge Bob or The Simpsons who would look good in this hue, but I have yet to see it.

—From “LD-at-Large” by Nook Schoenfeld, PLSN, Sept. 2013

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TV’s Future: No Longer “Linear”

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From traditional “linear” TV to TiVo to Netflix to streaming media and Google Glass, the world of television is changing fast, with no signs of stopping. The big question is — what does the future hold for broadcasting? Where’s this all leading? Should they begin tearing down the broadcast towers and antennas? Honestly, my crystal ball doesn’t see that far into the future, but something is definitely stirring in the near term…The direction is summed up by Netflix, in a recently published white paper called Netflix Long Term View: “Over the coming decades and across the world, Internet TV will replace linear TV. Apps will replace channels, remote controls will disappear, and screens will proliferate. As Internet TV grows from millions to billions, Netflix, HBO and ESPN are leading the way.” Stay tuned and brace yourself, people — it’s changing fast.

—From “Video World” by Paul Berliner, PLSN, Aug. 2013

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Stepping Into a 3D Future

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Is 3D a passing fad, or will it become a regular component of the live touring effects arsenal? If you ask ESPN, which launched with much ballyhoo its slate of 3D sports channels in 2010, the most recent answer would be “fad”…but Primus might beg to differ. The trio embraced the concept for both legs of their 2012-2013 U.S. Green Naugahyde tour, which ended in June. Los Angeles-based 3D Live was the 3D technology provider for the shows, whose three-dimensional center screen was flanked by the 2D video screens the band has used before, in some cases with the content from the two overlapping. What made the application of 3D tricky was the need for the audience to wear anaglyphic glasses to get the 3D effect, however. Aaron K. Craig, Primus’ lighting designer, says they band had to carry as many as 30,000 pairs of plastic glasses with them on their tour of 1,500-seat clubs and 3,000-seat theaters.

—From “The Biz” by Dan Daley, PLSN, Aug. 2013

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